Tattooist who suffers from cystic fibrosis becomes the unlikely master of Tātatau – a traditional Polynesian tattoo method that uses BONES instead of a needle

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  • Croc Coulter, a heavily tattooed Englishman living in Rarotonga in the Cook Islands, is dedicated to the art 
  • Tātatau tattooing is the process where the skin is struck with handmade tools of bone or tusks, and ink 
  • This method creates tattoos of elaborate symmetrical patterns or designs that are steeped in tradition 
  • Mr Coulter has taken on an apprentice Moko Smith to help pass on the revered Cook Island custom  

An English tattooist is the unlikely master of the traditional Polynesian art of Tātatau and he is dedicated to passing on the revered Cook Island tradition.

To ensure the method continues Croc Coulter, a heavily tattooed Englishman from Rarotonga in the Cook Islands, has taken on a new apprentice and is passing on his knowledge.

Tātatau tattooing is the process where the skin is struck with handmade tools of bone or tusks, and ink to create elaborate symmetrical patterns or designs steeped in tradition.

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Meet the woman who can talk to ANIMALS: Faye Rogers reveals her donkeys speak to her about crime shows, her llamas like to discuss American politics and she even chats to WORMS in her garden

daily-mail-logo-vector1Many animal lovers dream of being able to speak to their pets so they can have a natter about all the scrapes they get into.

But for Faye Rogers this is a daily reality.

Dubbed Dr Dolittle by her friends, the ‘animal communicator’ claims she chats about American politics with her llamas and dissects crimes dramas with her donkey, Thistle.

Living on a farm in Christchurch, New Zealand, with her goldfish, a rabbit, budgies, a cat, guinea pigs, llamas, four dogs, a donkey and a pet sheep called Beanie, she is never short of company.

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Faye Rogers from Christchurch, New Zealand, claims that she can speak to animals, pictured with her Irish wolfhound called Emerald

She even claims animals have warned her about impending disasters such as the Victoria bushfires and earthquakes in Haiti and China

But she said her ‘gift’ can, at times, get a little overwhelming because she sometimes feels bombarded by the thoughts of all the animals surrounding her.

She even claims animals have warned her about impending disasters such as the Victoria bushfires and earthquakes in Haiti and China, but says it is ‘not her place to stop it’.

‘You go outside and the birds are talking to you. You sit on the grass and the worms are talking to you,’ she said in a Loading Docs documentary called ‘Conversations With Pets’.

In the film she introduced some of her pets, saying that she sometimes speaks to them about ‘the most unusual things’.

The 'animal communicator' said she regularly chats to her donkey, Thistle, (pictured together) about various crime dramas

The ‘animal communicator’ said she regularly chats to her donkey, Thistle, (pictured together) about various crime dramas

Conversations with Pets – Meet Faye Rogers who talks with animals

Dubbed Dr Dolittle by her friends, Ms Rogers also said she chats about American politics with her llamas

Dubbed Dr Dolittle by her friends, Ms Rogers also said she chats about American politics with her llamas

White patting and feeding her llamas, she said: ‘I do converse with my pets on a day-to-day basis.

‘I’ve had the lectures on American politics.’

She also gave an insight into the thoughts and feelings of her pet donkey, Thistle.

Opening the gate of his enclosure, she said: ‘Here’s my wonderful donkey.  Hey do you want to come out?

‘And she tells me, ‘ah of course am I stupid?”

‘She said it’s f****** about time you got here. Yeah, here we have a donkey that swears.’

Ms Rogers revealed that she often chatted with her donkey about crime shows.

‘With TV she’ll be outside the door watching it. Just from her point of view they’ve got to have a really good storyline, but strong characters to actually bring it together,’ she said.

‘It’s quite magical talking to animals because they are sharing their experiences with you. It’s giving you a perspective into their world.’

She claims that she can tune into animals’ thoughts to give owners an insight into their pets’ health and behaviour, much like a horse whisperer.

She claims that she can tune into animals' thoughts to give owners an insight into their pets' health and behaviour, much like a horse whisperer

She claims that she can tune into animals’ thoughts to give owners an insight into their pets’ health and behaviour, much like a horse whisperer

Ms Rogers was seen receiving a frantic Skype call from an American client about a lost kitten

Ms Rogers was seen receiving a frantic Skype call from an American client about a lost kitten

She said her 'gift' can, at times, get a little overwhelming because she sometimes feels bombarded by the thoughts of all the animals surrounding her

She said her ‘gift’ can, at times, get a little overwhelming because she sometimes feels bombarded by the thoughts of all the animals surrounding her

Ms Rogers, who refers to herself as a ‘healer, teacher and visionary’, is aware many people are skeptical, but says they become convinced after she provides personal information.

She started speaking to animals to help friends, but now charges up to $85-an-hour for ‘communication sessions’ and $40 for healing.

During the film Ms Rogers was seen receiving a frantic Skype call from an American client about a lost kitten.

She asks the tearful woman: ‘Tell me where you’ve looked. I will keep talking to her and see if we can get him to come out and show himself.’

Her client can be heard calling out the cat’s name, shouting: ‘Finn, Finn’.

Ms Rogers then wrote on her computer screen, claiming she was channelling the thoughts of the cat.

‘To communicate with any animal they don’t have to be present with me,’ she said.

The American woman was later seen Skyping Ms Rogers again to tell her that she had found her kitten.

She told Ms Rogers: ‘You’re wonderful with what you do, I feel more connected with the animals. It brings joy and it also brings a little sorrow and pain.

Ms Rogers looks after a pond of goldfish, a rabbit, budgies, a cat, guinea pigs, llamas, four dogs – including an Irish wolfhound called Emerald – a pet sheep called Beanie, and Thistle the donkey

Ms Rogers looks after a pond of goldfish, a rabbit, budgies, a cat, guinea pigs, llamas, four dogs – including an Irish wolfhound called Emerald – a pet sheep called Beanie, and Thistle the donkey

In the film she introduced some of her pets including her llamas, saying that she sometimes speaks to them about 'the most unusual things'

In the film she introduced some of her pets including her llamas, saying that she sometimes speaks to them about ‘the most unusual things’

Ms Rogers said animals have always been a 'big part of her life' and revealed that she became interested in breeding dogs in her teenage years

Ms Rogers said animals have always been a ‘big part of her life’ and revealed that she became interested in breeding dogs in her teenage years

‘I don’t know what I would do if I didn’t have you.’

Ms Rogers said animals have always been a ‘big part of her life’ and revealed that she became interested in breeding dogs in her teenage years.

‘As a small child I would blurt out something that one of our family animals had shared or what the birds flying overhead were advising off,’ she said.

‘I remember a few childhood experiences when animals would be telling me things and I would tell my mum and she would say ‘animals don’t talk, that’s cartoons’.’

She described dogs and horses as ‘direct’ and birds as ‘busy and purposeful’ in an interview with stuff.co.nz.

And she revealed that cats play with mice because they are giving them respect and are ‘giving them a second chance or time to get away’.

Ms Rogers also said farmed animals are happy to be farmed as long as they are ‘treated well’.

via The Daily Mail