Hearts and eyeballs

Screen Shot 2016-08-18 at 10.04.04 amAs audiences fracture across screens and platforms, Loading Docs are thinking outside the box to create and distribute NZ short documentaries. Julia Parnell tells us more.
Loading Docs was created to inject some innovative thinking into the creation and distribution of New Zealand documentaries. With backing from NZ On Air and NZ Film Commission they have taken short docos to screens around the world including film festivals, TVNZ OnDemand, mainstream media and in-flight entertainment.

 

Each year Loading Docs selects 10 short documentary proposals, which are then supported from development through to distribution. As they get ready to release the 2016 shorts, executive producer Julia Parnell shares her top tips for connecting with media and audiences.

“Think about your audience as a community and have meaningful engagement with them, you want hearts not eyeballs.”

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LOADING DOCS 2016: GET SET TO GET BOOSTED

Media Release 23 February 2016

On Tuesday 23rd February, 10 incredible new Loading Docs projects will launch their crowdfunding campaigns. It is a nerve wracking time for all ten teams as they embark on their mission to raise $2000 in one month in order to unlock access to match funding and begin their Loading Docs journey. They will then create 10 unique 3-minute documentaries that delight, engage and change the way that New Zealanders see exceptional real life local stories.

These 10 new films come hot on the heels of an impressive milestone for the Loading Docs brand, whose previous documentary shorts have cumulatively hit a million views across a variety of platforms; Online, OnDemand and on the big screen.

The 2016 Loading Docs shorts will create the opportunity to experience change in many different ways. Some films share personal stories of dramatic change, others address major social, political and environmental changes, and all have the potential to change the way viewers think and feel.

For the third year running the Loading Docs initiative will fund, create and distribute ten local 3- minute documentaries online, with support from NZ On Air and The New Zealand Film Commission. The documentary makers each need to raise $2000 via crowd funding. Once that target is met the Loading Docs fund contributes $4000 worth of production funds plus a post- production package at Toybox and Sale Street Studios. Each Loading Docs project also receives ongoing mentoring and support throughout production.

The documentaries are then created and released in July. “With online marketing and distribution ruling modern media, crowdfunding is an integral starting point for the Loading Docs teams, providing an opportunity for the filmmakers to find an audience for their work early in the creative process. This way the core audience is invested in the subject matter, the process and ultimately the stories and filmmakers themselves” says Executive Producer Julia Parnell.

Loading Docs has once again partnered with arts funding website Boosted and the ten campaigns will run for one month, ending on the 24th March. Auckland Boosted Ambassador, Dominic Hoey has this to say about working with Loading Docs this year “At Boosted we’re all really excited to get behind Loading Docs for another year, and help some of the country’s most promising film makers bring their ideas to life.”

The initiative’s executive producers Anna Jackson and Julia Parnell are thrilled with the high calibre of this year’s shorts and hope the public will also be inspired to get behind the incredible talent and the compelling local stories and give them the Boost they need to get their documentaries made.

See the 2016 LOADING DOCS: CHANGE 
shorts HERE. 

The Jump: Meet The Ballsy Creators of Bungee

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With a healthy mix of imagination, balls and roughly remembered Newtonian physics, a kiwi bloke jumped off a bridge in 1980 and started what has become a worldwide phenomenon. ‘The Jump’ is an original story of bungee jumping and its unsung creator Chris Sigglekow unearthed by filmmakers Alex Sutherland and Rebekah Kelly. A Great Big Story by our friends at Loading Docs.

via Great Big Story

Dancing in the Dark

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Peter Vosper leads a double life, engineer by day, dancing neon robot by night. He leads “No Lights No Lycra,” where dancers lose their inhibitions and cast off their social masks. Our friends at Loading Docs show that life is better when you let it all hang out.

via Great Big Story

Meet the woman who can talk to ANIMALS: Faye Rogers reveals her donkeys speak to her about crime shows, her llamas like to discuss American politics and she even chats to WORMS in her garden

daily-mail-logo-vector1Many animal lovers dream of being able to speak to their pets so they can have a natter about all the scrapes they get into.

But for Faye Rogers this is a daily reality.

Dubbed Dr Dolittle by her friends, the ‘animal communicator’ claims she chats about American politics with her llamas and dissects crimes dramas with her donkey, Thistle.

Living on a farm in Christchurch, New Zealand, with her goldfish, a rabbit, budgies, a cat, guinea pigs, llamas, four dogs, a donkey and a pet sheep called Beanie, she is never short of company.

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Faye Rogers from Christchurch, New Zealand, claims that she can speak to animals, pictured with her Irish wolfhound called Emerald

She even claims animals have warned her about impending disasters such as the Victoria bushfires and earthquakes in Haiti and China

But she said her ‘gift’ can, at times, get a little overwhelming because she sometimes feels bombarded by the thoughts of all the animals surrounding her.

She even claims animals have warned her about impending disasters such as the Victoria bushfires and earthquakes in Haiti and China, but says it is ‘not her place to stop it’.

‘You go outside and the birds are talking to you. You sit on the grass and the worms are talking to you,’ she said in a Loading Docs documentary called ‘Conversations With Pets’.

In the film she introduced some of her pets, saying that she sometimes speaks to them about ‘the most unusual things’.

The 'animal communicator' said she regularly chats to her donkey, Thistle, (pictured together) about various crime dramas

The ‘animal communicator’ said she regularly chats to her donkey, Thistle, (pictured together) about various crime dramas

Conversations with Pets – Meet Faye Rogers who talks with animals

Dubbed Dr Dolittle by her friends, Ms Rogers also said she chats about American politics with her llamas

Dubbed Dr Dolittle by her friends, Ms Rogers also said she chats about American politics with her llamas

White patting and feeding her llamas, she said: ‘I do converse with my pets on a day-to-day basis.

‘I’ve had the lectures on American politics.’

She also gave an insight into the thoughts and feelings of her pet donkey, Thistle.

Opening the gate of his enclosure, she said: ‘Here’s my wonderful donkey.  Hey do you want to come out?

‘And she tells me, ‘ah of course am I stupid?”

‘She said it’s f****** about time you got here. Yeah, here we have a donkey that swears.’

Ms Rogers revealed that she often chatted with her donkey about crime shows.

‘With TV she’ll be outside the door watching it. Just from her point of view they’ve got to have a really good storyline, but strong characters to actually bring it together,’ she said.

‘It’s quite magical talking to animals because they are sharing their experiences with you. It’s giving you a perspective into their world.’

She claims that she can tune into animals’ thoughts to give owners an insight into their pets’ health and behaviour, much like a horse whisperer.

She claims that she can tune into animals' thoughts to give owners an insight into their pets' health and behaviour, much like a horse whisperer

She claims that she can tune into animals’ thoughts to give owners an insight into their pets’ health and behaviour, much like a horse whisperer

Ms Rogers was seen receiving a frantic Skype call from an American client about a lost kitten

Ms Rogers was seen receiving a frantic Skype call from an American client about a lost kitten

She said her 'gift' can, at times, get a little overwhelming because she sometimes feels bombarded by the thoughts of all the animals surrounding her

She said her ‘gift’ can, at times, get a little overwhelming because she sometimes feels bombarded by the thoughts of all the animals surrounding her

Ms Rogers, who refers to herself as a ‘healer, teacher and visionary’, is aware many people are skeptical, but says they become convinced after she provides personal information.

She started speaking to animals to help friends, but now charges up to $85-an-hour for ‘communication sessions’ and $40 for healing.

During the film Ms Rogers was seen receiving a frantic Skype call from an American client about a lost kitten.

She asks the tearful woman: ‘Tell me where you’ve looked. I will keep talking to her and see if we can get him to come out and show himself.’

Her client can be heard calling out the cat’s name, shouting: ‘Finn, Finn’.

Ms Rogers then wrote on her computer screen, claiming she was channelling the thoughts of the cat.

‘To communicate with any animal they don’t have to be present with me,’ she said.

The American woman was later seen Skyping Ms Rogers again to tell her that she had found her kitten.

She told Ms Rogers: ‘You’re wonderful with what you do, I feel more connected with the animals. It brings joy and it also brings a little sorrow and pain.

Ms Rogers looks after a pond of goldfish, a rabbit, budgies, a cat, guinea pigs, llamas, four dogs – including an Irish wolfhound called Emerald – a pet sheep called Beanie, and Thistle the donkey

Ms Rogers looks after a pond of goldfish, a rabbit, budgies, a cat, guinea pigs, llamas, four dogs – including an Irish wolfhound called Emerald – a pet sheep called Beanie, and Thistle the donkey

In the film she introduced some of her pets including her llamas, saying that she sometimes speaks to them about 'the most unusual things'

In the film she introduced some of her pets including her llamas, saying that she sometimes speaks to them about ‘the most unusual things’

Ms Rogers said animals have always been a 'big part of her life' and revealed that she became interested in breeding dogs in her teenage years

Ms Rogers said animals have always been a ‘big part of her life’ and revealed that she became interested in breeding dogs in her teenage years

‘I don’t know what I would do if I didn’t have you.’

Ms Rogers said animals have always been a ‘big part of her life’ and revealed that she became interested in breeding dogs in her teenage years.

‘As a small child I would blurt out something that one of our family animals had shared or what the birds flying overhead were advising off,’ she said.

‘I remember a few childhood experiences when animals would be telling me things and I would tell my mum and she would say ‘animals don’t talk, that’s cartoons’.’

She described dogs and horses as ‘direct’ and birds as ‘busy and purposeful’ in an interview with stuff.co.nz.

And she revealed that cats play with mice because they are giving them respect and are ‘giving them a second chance or time to get away’.

Ms Rogers also said farmed animals are happy to be farmed as long as they are ‘treated well’.

via The Daily Mail

Short Kiwi docos packed with emotion

Stuff+logoI was stunned, delighted, knocked out. More importantly, I was moved. At one point I reluctantly tore myself away from the screen, dashing outside to haul in the washing during an afternoon sun-shower, but my cheeks were already wet before I made it out the door. A film called Gina had, in three short minutes, broken my heart.

Innovative local film project Loading Docs was tailor-made for a big sook like me. Here, in glorious hi-def video, are fellow New Zealanders telling stories packed with emotion. The catch? They have just three minutes to do so.

The concept is simple. Each year, ten teams of promising documentary makers are mentored while they make a short doco, with funding from the NZ Film Commission and NZ On Air. The filmmakers have to pitch, write and develop the story, shoot and edit it, and crowd-fund some of the money themselves. But most of all, they have to learn to cut to the chase.

These are docos that capture your attention, make a few strong points, then they’re gone. Thank you and good night. Roll credits. Their brevity is extraordinary, given their impact. It is like comparing the overheated waffle of this column with an elegant haiku. This is storytelling with all excess baggage stripped away, which is an inspiration to a long-winded soul like me.

“The project has a strong professional development focus,” says Julia Parnell, an award-winning doco maker who executive produces the series alongside AUT media academic Anna Jackson. “It makes filmmakers really hone down what they want to say. Three minutes is long enough to use innovative cinematic techniques and deliver a strong message, but short enough that people will watch them and pick up that message. That time constraint makes a filmmaker get straight to the heart of their story, and then later on, they can take what they’ve learned into making longer films.”

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‘Wilbur Force’ Is A Touching Documentary About Pro-wrestling, Friendship, And Never Giving Up

logo-scriptWilbur Force was a former champ in the field of New Zealand pro-wrestling. But, as the saying goes, the higher you climb the further you have to fall. And, after a few glorious years at the top of the pro-wrestling food chain, Wilbur (real name William McDougall) found himself back in his hometown, unemployed, and out of shape.

That’s where we meet him in three minute documentary Wilbur Force, part of the Loading Docs series, which is directed by his friend and now life coach J.Ollie Lucks. Knowing he was down on his luck, Lucks seeks to get out of this rut and re-boot his career.

So he made this tragicomic offbeat tale, succinctly told in the three minutes it has, to help him do that.

Lucks says the film, along with motivating McDougall to get back to being the great entertainer he once was, is also about “Holding on to one’s best self and having a mate to remind you what your best self was.”

The good news? “The film did actually make him get off his ass.” says Lucks. “He will be wrestling again for the first time in three years, this August.”

via Smash

Tihei: The Kiwi Freestyle Rapper

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Loading Docs is a New-Zealand production company that helps nurture local talent. They work with filmmakers who aim to captivate audiences with stories strong enough to be told within three minutes.

At heart, this particular documentary is a story about the different ways we feel comfortable to communicate.

For Tihei it’s through freestyle rap. The moment he starts singing you can see his confidence rise. It’s incredible to believe he can string together the rhythm and rhymes on the spot.

But that’s just the surface of the story.

As you listen into what Tihei has to say, you become aware of the struggles he has faced and you can’t help but appreciate the beauty in the freedom of freestyle rap.

You can watch more from the guys at Loading Docs over here.

via The Huffington Post Australia